Steel bridge

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zoegraf

Craftsman at heart
#1
Can anyone identify what type of bridge this is and if anyone might make something similar to it. I have no idea how old it is, but I'm sure it would be appropriate for the mid 1950's.
 
#4
It is very appropriate for the mid 1950's.
I was take this picture last year in Viet-Nam, of a similar bridge build in those years.

 
#8
Zoegraf,
Try making one yourself. I made this from small wood pieces I got from Home depot.

The curved arches could be made by cutting a plywood template to the desired curve with a jigsaw then take the wood for your bridge hold it over a boiling tea kettle to "steam it". Then tack it to your curved plywood template and let it dry out. I may take a few tries to get it to your liking. Not the detail of the brass options but cost allot less. If you make a template for the structure on paper and tack it to a wood base and cover with wax paper, you will be able to see the lines on the paper template and glue the supports exactly as you like them and the template can be reused for the other side of the bridge to make a perfect match. I used those free paint mixing sticks to make the corner braces on my bridge then sanded them thin with a belt sander.
-Art
 
#9
It is very appropriate for the mid 1950's.
I was take this picture last year in Viet-Nam, of a similar bridge build in those years.

But this is a Pratt truss. Note that the diagonals go from the top corners down toward the center. A Warren truss has alternating diagonals, forming "W's for Warren".
 

zoegraf

Craftsman at heart
#10
Zoegraf,
Try making one yourself. I made this from small wood pieces I got from Home depot.

The curved arches could be made by cutting a plywood template to the desired curve with a jigsaw then take the wood for your bridge hold it over a boiling tea kettle to "steam it". Then tack it to your curved plywood template and let it dry out. I may take a few tries to get it to your liking. Not the detail of the brass options but cost allot less. If you make a template for the structure on paper and tack it to a wood base and cover with wax paper, you will be able to see the lines on the paper template and glue the supports exactly as you like them and the template can be reused for the other side of the bridge to make a perfect match. I used those free paint mixing sticks to make the corner braces on my bridge then sanded them thin with a belt sander.
-Art
That is very nice. Tempting...
 
#12
Xavier,
I like the look of that curved Vietnamese bridge. I might have to try and make one of those as well for my train shelf layout to go with my truss bridge.
-Art
 
#20
That Atlas bridge just seems too short and compressed to me. Almost as if it needs another span or section added to it to look right. I have been looking for a nice appearing Pratt style truss bridge for a while myself. Im not about to pay big bucks for the brass units.
 



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