Questions answered regarding modeling and prototype

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#2
Folks, in case you didn't know, DJ is a real 1:1 scale train engineer. Also, again, if you didn't know, most mainline rail is made in very long lengths (eliminating most of the old clickity clack caused by jointed rail sections) and are fed end wise into perhaps 10-15 coupled rail cars, then pulled out at other end and lowered down onto the ties as engine moves extremely slow...And yes, these rails bend when rounding a curve.
Thanks DJ....M, Los Angeles
 
#3
The normal length of a continuous welded rail is 1/4 mile (1250 ft or so), so that means its more like 20 cars. A typical train can hold 30-40 rails. The rails are attached to the middle car. To unload the cars they chain the end of the rail to the track and then pull the train out from under the rail.
 

Boris

Beach Bum
#4
Most people are unaware that the Rail Trains used to drop CWR along the right of way, are also capable of picking up rail along the right of way. What's most amazing is when they pick up ¼ mile sections of stick rail still bolted to the splice bars. I witnessed this along the CR Lehigh line in 1987, when the second main track was picked up. (It has since been restored).

Boris
 

NYC_George

Well-Known Member
#5
I got called to work one of these work trains around 1975. 13 cars comes to mind for some reason but it was so long ago it could be any number. I remember the rails ran through a set of rollers. The rail did seem to bend very easily.

George
 

NYC_George

Well-Known Member
#6
I always like your videos DJ. Like you said, lots of stress being an RR engineer. Don't ever forget anything or miss a signal because you didn't have enough sleep. Don't plan on being home much. That's why I only lasted 13 years there.
George
 

trailrider

Well-Known Member
#7
I may not have understood him correctly, but I think he said that no matter which way a prototype locomotive was facing in an MU lashup, the loco would go in the same direction as the lead unit. That is also true of model locomotives IF they are operating on DC power. But, DCC locos must have their decoders programmed if they are running backwards with a lead unit that is running forwards! I forget which CV must be changed from 1 to 2, but check with the instructions for a particular model.
 

NYC_George

Well-Known Member
#8
I forget which CV must be changed from 1 to 2, but check with the instructions for a particular model.
This is the reason I use the ESU programmer or JMRI to set CV's. You don't have to remember anything just click on the graphic interface. I prefer the ESU programmer because it's so much easier to use than JMRI. I don't think JMRI can program the matrix type system loksound uses maybe some simple stuff. The drawback is the ESU programmer cost a $145.00. I will not buy another decoder unless it's loksound. They are just so much better than others now. For the other brands I've bought in the past I use JMRI although it's such a pain. I have a pre 2004 NCE Power Pro and every time I want to use JMRI I have to press the PROG/ESC 14 times pre instruction to reset the controller. What a pain that's why I went for the $145.00.





lok_sound_programmer_1.JPG



jmri_cvs.JPG
 

trailrider

Well-Known Member
#10
If the 2x4 is long enough and you have it oriented so the 2" surfaces are top and bottom, it will bend a certain amount. Don't forget the curves on the prototype mainlines are nowhere as tight as on our models. I was once asked to design a single H-beam about 100 ft. long that could lift a bunch of pipe on L-shaped hooks suspended below it, with the beam lifted by a crane with cables positioned at various places along the top of the beam. Turned out, it couldn't be done, as the beam would twist and the flanges would "cripple". Try to bend the rails too tight and the same thing would happen. But, as I said, the radius of curves was much less than on a model railroad.
 

cv_acr

Active Member
#11
Comparing the bendiness of wood and steel is kinda apples and oranges though.

But....

Take a 2' long piece of 2x4, you'll have a hard time seeing any bend in it if you support both ends and stand on it in the middle. Now take a 16' long 2x4 and it'll sag pretty easily in the middle.

A short piece of steel rail you wouldn't think would bend either - but take a longer piece and you can get some bends into it just like model rail.
 
#12
I may not have understood him correctly, but I think he said that no matter which way a prototype locomotive was facing in an MU lashup, the loco would go in the same direction as the lead unit. That is also true of model locomotives IF they are operating on DC power. But, DCC locos must have their decoders programmed if they are running backwards with a lead unit that is running forwards! I forget which CV must be changed from 1 to 2, but check with the instructions for a particular model.
Funny, when I had my last layout, NCE/DCC, I don't recall that being the case.. If it's 2 steamers coupled in opposite directions, either in consist or individually run like the 1:1 scale had to, or if both were pointing in the same direction, I believe having done nothing direction-wise they rolled automatically in the same direction. If the rear one had been a pusher, uncoupled at the crest of the hill to go back down, of course it's direction would have to be reversed by hitting the 'reverse' button at it's address (loco 192, say)..Maybe I'm wrong...
 

cv_acr

Active Member
#13
But, DCC locos must have their decoders programmed if they are running backwards with a lead unit that is running forwards! I forget which CV must be changed from 1 to 2, but check with the instructions for a particular model.
Why are you messing around with CVs? Just use consisting...
 

CambriaArea51

Well-Known Member
#14
For DCC you just need to "MU" or consisting as cv-arc said.For digitrax for example the lead loco is on the right of the controller,trailing on the left. With both running in the same direction no matter which way the trail unit is facing you would press the MU button,it will say mu yes/no you would press yes and now the lead unit runs both. To add more units you would add them on the left and mu that it'll add to the consist.
IMG_2538.jpg
IMG_2499.jpg
 
#15
For DCC you just need to "MU" or consisting as cv-arc said.For digitrax for example the lead loco is on the right of the controller,trailing on the left. With both running in the same direction no matter which way the trail unit is facing you would press the MU button,it will say mu yes/no you would press yes and now the lead unit runs both. To add more units you would add them on the left and mu that it'll add to the consist. View attachment 34610 View attachment 34611
THAT IS BEAUTIFUL
 





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