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Thread: Steam locomotive and cars derailing at crossing

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    I sent an email to Hornby recently asking about information on the train asked about the derailings and and got a nice reply.

    "Thank you for the inquiry. Your locomotive is from the ‘Railroad’ range- not quite as thoroughly detailed as the regular line. The best I can determine it is not DCC ready in that it does not have a pre-installed socket for a DCC decoder. The Hornby UK site does show how to install a dcc decoder in this locomotive- I have attached a link to this page for your convenience:https://www.hornby.com/us-en/r2675-r...r-installation

    OO means a scale of 1:76 whereas HO is 1:87- for some reason the Brits decided to use regular HO scale track. The flange depth and back-to-back wheel spacing are an issue when running on less than code 100 track- on code 83 you will have to check each switch and crossing for flangeway depth and width to resolve your issue.

    Kind regards,"


    I also talked with Intermountain about their 40055 bulk 33" wheel sets and was told that it should help with the cars and if it doesn't then try getting a micro file and file down some of the built up plastic.

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    Is this the original Flying Scotsman? Yeppers, deep flanges. A club member had me do repairs to his to run right on the club layout. I have taken a dremel cutoff wheel, spinning, and lightly edge nudge it on the flanges as they spin to grind down the flanges. The engine I had running doing the same edge nudging to grind the flanges down, did same on a rivarossi 2-8-4. The alternative is to file down the flangeways on the crossover which may be an easier fix, perhaps slightly widen the guardrails. If you do this, do it in steps, file some down, try the train, check, file again. Try normal cars to make sure they dont go flying down the wrong track.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dinwitty View Post
    Is this the original Flying Scotsman? Yeppers, deep flanges. A club member had me do repairs to his to run right on the club layout. I have taken a dremel cutoff wheel, spinning, and lightly edge nudge it on the flanges as they spin to grind down the flanges. The engine I had running doing the same edge nudging to grind the flanges down, did same on a rivarossi 2-8-4. The alternative is to file down the flangeways on the crossover which may be an easier fix, perhaps slightly widen the guardrails. If you do this, do it in steps, file some down, try the train, check, file again. Try normal cars to make sure they dont go flying down the wrong track.
    Thanks. Don't think I'm brave enough to grind on the flanges yet but I'll give it a try on the cross over. I have some files but I don't think they will be narrow enough. I'll have to see what I can find at some hobby shops.

  4. #14
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    Default

    Look for jeweller's files or Warding files that are (or were) used by toolmakers. I would caution against grinding the flanges down while on the engine. You'll get grit and filings into the "works". It's probably the flanges on the leading truck that's doing the derailing before the drivers anyway.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tootnkumin View Post
    Look for jeweller's files or Warding files that are (or were) used by toolmakers. I would caution against grinding the flanges down while on the engine. You'll get grit and filings into the "works". It's probably the flanges on the leading truck that's doing the derailing before the drivers anyway.
    Hi tootnkumin,

    Thanks. I'll look for the files and see if I can find them locally. If not, there is always the internet!! I don't think I'll try grinding down the flanges. With my luck, I'll make them lopsided. I think your right about the leading truck causing the problem, when I run the train slowly over the cross over, the wheels on the front truck (pilot??) come right out of the cross over. Haven't tried putting them back to see what the drive wheels do at the cross over. I'll have to play with it this weekend.

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    I have hand built doubleslip turnouts and special work, normal wheels will just mini-drop down and come back, the flange support on the prototype is important but not so crucial on the model, model makers want to be accurate but my hand built versions dont have the flange support at all. Doubleslips have a VERY narrow crossing and mine worked. You could go to any Walgreens etc and find nail files, or look up Michaels, Hobby Lobby..uhm well your hobby shop..maybe...hint...nudge...nail files may work on plastic but dunno on metal...

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    Quote Originally Posted by dinwitty View Post
    I have hand built doubleslip turnouts and special work, normal wheels will just mini-drop down and come back, the flange support on the prototype is important but not so crucial on the model, model makers want to be accurate but my hand built versions dont have the flange support at all. Doubleslips have a VERY narrow crossing and mine worked. You could go to any Walgreens etc and find nail files, or look up Michaels, Hobby Lobby..uhm well your hobby shop..maybe...hint...nudge...nail files may work on plastic but dunno on metal...
    Hi dinwitty,

    Thanks. I think I know where my wife keeps hers. If not, Walmart is down the road and Hobby Lobby is near by.

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    You might carefully try filing some of the plastic using a flat Swiss needle file. Your thought about using a Code 100 crossover might also be the solution. Of course you will have to shim the Code 83 track leading up to each end of the crossover, but that isn't all that difficult.

  9. #19
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    Nail files don't usually have cutting teeth along the edges, which is where you will need them to make the grooves deeper, some might, but not often.
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  10. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tootnkumin View Post
    Nail files don't usually have cutting teeth along the edges, which is where you will need them to make the grooves deeper, some might, but not often.
    I'm not talking nail files; I refer to Swiss needle files which do have cutting surfaces on the edges as well as the flats. Generally, the ones I've used are the right thickness to cut flangeways in most HO scale turnouts and crossings.

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