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Thread: Looking for Ideas to Store New Florescent Tubes

  1. #1

    Default Looking for Ideas to Store New Florescent Tubes

    I'm looking for some ideas as to where to store new four foot, florescent tubes. My layout is lighted by mostly four foot, F40 -T12 florescent tubes which are no longer manufactured and supplies will become limited. I stocked up a a supply of extras so I wouldn't have to retro fit my fixtures to T-5 tubes.

    Now where to store the tubes? Under the layout is full of storage and work areas. Most of the rest of the basement is finished and no where to hide them. Garage no place either.

    They would look out of place stored in the formal dining room...right?

    Any ideas?

    Thanks.

    Greg
    THE MILWAUKEE NORTHERN

    Transporters of Wood, Coal, Ore and Anything Else

    Est. 1983

    HO Scale

    __________________________________________________ ___________

    Where the SOO, Milwaukee Road, C&NW and Wisconsin Central Meet


    Charter Member of the Fallen Flags Model Railroad Club

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Colorado, Kansas, and servicing all points between
    Posts
    4,232

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg@mnrr View Post
    I'm looking for some ideas as to where to store new four foot, florescent tubes. My layout is lighted by mostly four foot, F40 -T12 florescent tubes which are no longer manufactured and supplies will become limited. I stocked up a a supply of extras so I wouldn't have to retro fit my fixtures to T-5 tubes.

    Now where to store the tubes? Under the layout is full of storage and work areas. Most of the rest of the basement is finished and no where to hide them. Garage no place either.

    They would look out of place stored in the formal dining room...right?
    Ha!, Only if the formal dining room is ever used. I think mine is under a half inch of dust due to lack of use.

    I have the advantage of having a Janitor's closet to store them in. I made a 4 foot long bin on the very top shelf. Also I keep the boxes they come in, so it isn't just loose tubes piled all over the place.

    But but but, I've been replacing my T8 and T12 bulbs with LEDs. Direct size replacements for $5.99 to $7.99. Much better light, less energy consumption, no chance of dropping and getting phosphor and mercury all over everything, and most importantly for my library and train layout room - zero UV emissions.
    Last edited by Iron Horseman; 11-10-2017 at 01:08 PM.

  3. #3

    Default

    Hanging lights or built into the ceiling? If hanging, can you store them on top of the lights?
    Ian

    Modeling my own reality: Cole River...

  4. #4

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    Hi,

    Well it's too late now but at some point in the future you might investigate LED replacements.

    Frederick

  5. #5

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    Not sure where you got your info, but only low CRI T12's are discontinued. My local Home Depot has about 800 T12's in stock. I store my stock of bulbs (I buy then in 10 packs, 4 packs at a time) in their cartons in the basement. But as the current on hand stock is depleted, I'm converting to LEDs for 2 reasons: more light and less heat.
    Kevin

    General Manager
    Red Oak and Western Railway Company

  6. #6

    Default

    Ian: Good idea on the storage of the lamps in the ceiling. I'll use an area in the other finished part of the basement. Spread the load a bit in a few areas.

    Had to purchase the lamps loose, so no boxes to storage them in.

    Kevin: From Sylvania's website...

    T12 Fluorescent Lamps ​Federal energy legislation such as EPACT (The Energy Policy Act) mandates the phase out of many of the older T12 linear fluorescent lamp types. Advances in newer, more energy efficient fluorescent systems like T8 and T5, and CFL, coupled with utility rebate incentive programs, give end users every opportunity to replace outdated T12 systems and lower their electric bills.
    For applications where T12 lamps are still needed, Very High Output (VHO) and High Output (HO) Rapid start lamps, as well as Slimline Instant start lamps are available in a variety of lengths. There is a limited selection of 4-ft Rapid start, 8-ft Slimline Instant Start, and 8-ft High Output (HO) Rapid start T12 lamps for specialty applications including cold temperature, color critical, and plant growth.

    Also: Hasn't the manufacturing of magnetic ballasts for many fluorescent tubes been phased out?

    Just my 2 cents worth.

    Greg
    Last edited by Greg@mnrr; 11-12-2017 at 03:05 PM.
    THE MILWAUKEE NORTHERN

    Transporters of Wood, Coal, Ore and Anything Else

    Est. 1983

    HO Scale

    __________________________________________________ ___________

    Where the SOO, Milwaukee Road, C&NW and Wisconsin Central Meet


    Charter Member of the Fallen Flags Model Railroad Club

  7. Default

    I would place a couple of lengths of strapping, lath, or whatever across three or four vertical frame members in your garage and slide the tubes behind them, vertically, between the upright 2X6 or whatever the uprights are. I keep garden tools and spare lumber in that type of position and out of the way. If you are worried about inadvertent damage, instead of using lath or strapping, use 1/2" plywood as a cover and slide the tubes behind it.
    Crandell

  8. #8

    Default

    Found a spot under the layout for the tubes. Will secure them them around a piece of plywood and put in a little used corner of the layout belly, with some fasting to secure them from falling.

    Thanks for all your input.

    Greg
    THE MILWAUKEE NORTHERN

    Transporters of Wood, Coal, Ore and Anything Else

    Est. 1983

    HO Scale

    __________________________________________________ ___________

    Where the SOO, Milwaukee Road, C&NW and Wisconsin Central Meet


    Charter Member of the Fallen Flags Model Railroad Club

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Colorado, Kansas, and servicing all points between
    Posts
    4,232

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg@mnrr View Post
    T12 Fluorescent Lamps ​Federal energy legislation such as EPACT (The Energy Policy Act) mandates the phase out of many of the older T12 linear fluorescent lamp types. Advances in newer, more energy efficient fluorescent systems like T8 and T5, and CFL, coupled with utility rebate incentive programs, give end users every opportunity to replace outdated T12 systems and lower their electric bills.
    Now if they would just do something to help me replace the T32's. I've yet to find an LED replacement for that.

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