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Thread: Interesting track plan, Tupper Lake & Faust Junction

  1. #1
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    Default Interesting track plan, Tupper Lake & Faust Junction

    This plan appeared in the Handbook #15, Track Planning Ideas from Model Railroader, (58 track plans from past issues), multiple printings beginning in 1981.

    I'm interested in posting a scan of that layout plan from my issue of that magazine, so that it might be discussed here on the forum. BUT, I can not find an active webpage reference to that track plan to make a definitive link to it.

    So I suppose I can post my copy of the layout plan since I have gone to the trouble of trying to find an archived one, and I will give due respect to the original author/source

    I am seriously considering modeling this plan with a few alterations, and would like to hear other opinions about the 'stock plan' as presented, and modifications that might be made.

    Brian

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    Over the past few months I've been going back thru numerous articles I have saved over the years looking for examples I might consider for my new plan. Just a few days ago I ran across this one, and could find very little references to it on the internet. There were some 'archived references' to it on the track plan index of Model Railroader, but when I clicked on there nothing came up,...it sent me back to the home of the index.

    I find this track plan VERY interesting, particularly when you consider the versatility contained in a 10 x 13 plan (with an extra little 'helix like' addition bump external to the main layout)




    description by the designer, Leonard Blumenschine
    The layout has two 'terminal locations', Tupper Lake and Faust Junction. Start from either terminal, follow the main line (ignoring the crossover at Big Wolf for the moment), and when you end up at the other terminal you'll find yourself putting your loco on a common turntable that links both terminals,...even though the terminals are distinct from each other in character and function, and are located more than 2 scale miles apart.

    At first the road was planned purely point-to-point, about 140 feet of folded and twisted main line. It was only when I was laying the sawmill siding at Big Wolf that I discovered that the addition of one simple crossover would provide for continuous lap running as well. Whether a train makes one lap, or repeatedly uses the 'accidental crossover', it is always headed for the other end of the line, and it never has to pass directly through its destination or origination point along the way while building up mileage.

    The accidental crossover creates a sort of dogbone pattern wrapped around the space and folded upon itself. In all, one lap is about 90 feet long....a scale mile and a half. If you continue to take the accidental crossover you could make quite a long trip out of it.

    The common turntable idea absorbed the dictates and helped shape the design. By keeping the terminals necessarily close together it created an interesting looking island and walking space for operating purposes. By eliminating the need for two turning facilities (either a second turntable, or a space eating wye), it simplified and compacted the whole design, but left maximum of space for the mainline.

  3. #3
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    An interesting plan and one that should hold the interest, The "helix" shape is actually 3 return loops, one above the other. Not easy to work out if any are reversing loops or not. If you get a short circuit on the first run, I guess you'll find out.
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    I agree with Toot. It is an interesting track plan and will not only give you a lot of switching opportunities, but also allow for continuous running.

    My layout was built mainly for switching as a point to point layout with a yard and engine terminal at each end. With the use of hidden staging tracks, I can also run trains continuously. Didn't know how much I would do that, but I do find myself letting trains run around the layout while working on projects on the layout. This lets me run different locomotives so none sit around. Keeps them lubricated plus when the grand kids or visitors want to see trains run, you can do that while having cversations about the layout.

    Nice plan.
    Last edited by montanan; 10-27-2017 at 07:51 AM.
    ................................ Chet


    Video - Switching in Churchill - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YR-tYl9fd9s
    VIDEO Tour of the layout - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qiNqrkq9xYY
    New cab ride - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QiL7SgH6Wbw

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    Quote Originally Posted by montanan View Post
    I agree with Toor. It is an interesting track plan and will not only give you a lot of switching opportunities, but also allow for continuous running.
    That was my thought as well. I've not been a big fan of all the switching work, but this plan will anticipate that eventuality should it emerge.

    I also find the two long sidings provided on either side interesting. They might well allow for freight trains to pull over to allow passenger trains to pass,....multiple trains on same main lines. These trains might even be operated in opposing directions,...that would be an operating challenge.

    Quote Originally Posted by montanan View Post
    My layout was built mainly for switching as a point to point layout with a yard and engine terminal at each end. With the use of hidden staging tracks, I can also run trains continuously. Didn't know how much I would do that, but I do find myself letting trains run around the layout while working on projects on the layout. This lets me run different locomotives so none sit around. Keeps them lubricated plus when the grand kids or visitors want to see trains run, you can do that while having cversations about the layout.

    Nice plan.
    I'm growing to like it more and more, even while it may force me to change from my original idea that I have invested considerable time in

  6. Default

    OK ... What did I miss here?
    Is this HO scale?
    That's a lot of railroading in a room that size! I like it very much!
    **********
    Sherrel
    I am starting to think I will never be old enough to know better!

  7. #7
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    Shameless plug: for especially where you want to run multiple trains on the same line and have them able to pass in opposite direction, without a lot of extra switches, blocks and insulating joints.= DCC control.
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    BTW it was drawn up for HO scale.

    And yes I already have a wireless NCE set up,...so DCC is in my plans for this layout.

    I've had some interesting observations about this layout design on another forum, and as soon as I get a little more time I will bring a few of those to this discussion,...plus my reply(s)

  9. Default

    Interesting concept, but really track intense. Every place is only a couple inches from a track. Would be very tough to scenic. Very much a "wedding cake" type of scenery.
    Dave H.

    Modeling the Philadelphia and Reading in 1900-1905
    Wooden cars and iron men

  10. #10
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    The spaghetti bowl objection is pretty much a foregone "has to be accepted" result of constrained space modelling, if you want a good track run and industry/yard activity. In this layout's case, the wide open prairies are catered for in that triple loop section and the imagination. A "Busy" plan is it's best description. With several trains on the go, no lack of attention to be had. I remember one in MR mag a few years ago, much bigger than this one, of the Argentine Yard around 4 walls and that's all there was to it. The scenery was all building flats and corner scene dividers. (Road overpasses etc)
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