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Thread: The Best Wheels and trucks

  1. Default

    Thank's Mark - You did that chart just for me as I was thinking that I needed to do it just so I could see them all together!

    Willie - Glad you added that about the IM axels being metal. Tom Holly swears by ReBoxx --- still all very confusing to me trying to get spun up on all the "new stuff" over the past 30 years!
    **********
    Sherrel
    I am starting to think I will never be old enough to know better!

  2. #32
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    Aug 2016
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    Central Minnesota, Park Rapids area.
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    Default

    Like I said, Reboxx wheels are all Code 88 width. However, a nice thing is that they come in varying axle lengths. Visit Reboxx.com for more information.
    Last edited by NP2626; 02-10-2018 at 07:32 PM.
    Mark D.

    Opinions given are my own and not meant to ruffle any feathers.
    Northern Pacific, really terrific!

  3. #33
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    Default 3 Axle Trucks combined with Small Flanges. Proto 2000 loco trucks are hinged

    BTW, have you taken notice that most 3 axle trucks on the Proto2000 locos were 'hinged' such that 2 of the axles were 'rigid acting', while the 3rd axle can adapt to short track height changes, ......such as in 'frog dipping'.


    Quote Originally Posted by beiland View Post
    I discovered long ago that I had a diesel loco (Athearn Genesis I believe it was) that had 3 axle trucks with very small flanges. It would be one of my first locos to derail if I had trouble spots. I inspected the situation very closely and discovered that with the slightest variation in rail heights within short distances (or over turnout points), the truck would choose to balance on only two of the axles, the two closest ones such as the center axle and one of the ends. That left the other end of the truck just slightly 'up in the air' where its small flange wheels could NOT keep it from riding over the railhead.

    That loco became my track laying tester. It could find my errors more precisely than laying a straight edge across the tracks.

    3 axle trucks can be troublesome, and possible worst if the truck frame is too flexible,...adding another dimension into the equation !

  4. #34
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    Central Minnesota, Park Rapids area.
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    Default

    As far as "Trucks" are concerned, I use the truck frames provided by the manufacturer of the subject freight or passenger car I'm building. Of the 160 or so revenue cars on my layout, all but around a 1/2 dozen; or so, have been built by myself from kits. I love to build models; so, RTR stuff holds no interest for me. When I need to buy trucks (the kit I am building did not come with trucks) I buy either Kadee; or, Walthers Proto trucks, not necessarily because they are the best; but, because I trust them as manufacturers. The "BEST" means different things to different people.
    Mark D.

    Opinions given are my own and not meant to ruffle any feathers.
    Northern Pacific, really terrific!

  5. #35
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    Default

    The trucks/wheels that are fitted to the MTH HO 60' flatcars I'm working on now are sprung. 3 springs per side and the side frames and bolsters are metal. The axles are metal (as are the wheels) and they have rotating bearing caps (real tiny). I got into the habit with the pointed axles in plastic sideframes of demounting the wheels to paint them, but these MTH ones would, I think require the dismantling of the trucks including removing and then replacing the springs (I don't think they are KD springs either). The only plastic parts I can see are the rotating caps. In the case of these sideframes, the small diameter extension of the axle on each side, doesn't unclip from the frame out of the bottom, the "bearing" encloses it, so at least 1 sideframe would have to come off. I took 1 cap off to find out what was involved. Getting it back on the end of the axle was enough to put me off trying any more.

    Painting them in-situ turned out to be not so bad, but washing in detergent was necessary to get them to take the paint (acrylic, water thinned). I might try some other type, if I can mix a suitable variety of rust colors. Oiling the bearings looks to be essential.
    CONVICTED SERIAL KIDDER

    I'm lost. I've gone to look for me. If I should return before I get back, please ask me to wait.

  6. #36
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    Default

    I wouldn't have disassembled the trucks, either, Toot! Good call on your part! I can't feature how you would have a very free rolling car with bearing caps that rotate with the axles. Can you explain how these trucks are set-up?

    I don't have any trucks with real springs on my layout. The tiny springs are too thin and light to look scale. I know that many modelers feel they are the best way to go and I should have saved and sold my sprung trucks on Ebay, instead of pitching them. I don't find many sprung trucks anymore.

    Funny how some things are important to me as far as looks are concerned and others not so much. No Real Springs, No Code 88 wheel-sets and Code 100 rail is good enough. However, it is my railroad, so back-off!
    Last edited by NP2626; 02-12-2018 at 05:42 AM.
    Mark D.

    Opinions given are my own and not meant to ruffle any feathers.
    Northern Pacific, really terrific!

  7. #37
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    Default Identifying derailment-prone trucks | Run like a Dream Rolling Stock

    Interesting video
    aY

  8. #38
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    Default

    beiland, great video! The only problem is that the only company that provides varying axle lengths is Reboxx and they only make Code 88 wheels! I guess this is why we need to buy complete trucks for replacements and not just wheel sets.
    Mark D.

    Opinions given are my own and not meant to ruffle any feathers.
    Northern Pacific, really terrific!

  9. #39
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    Default Athearn HO wheels - changed to RP-25 standard in 1963

    Interesting little history bit on Athearn change to RP25 wheel std.


    https://ogrforum.ogaugerr.com/topic/athearn-ho-wheels

  10. #40
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    Default Define RP-25 Wheel Configuration

    I have understood that the RP-25 meant conformation to flange depth, and not the tire width.

    My understanding now is that there are RP-25 wheels with threads of .110", and threads of .088", So perhaps when we are discussing these subjects we should go further into properly describing the RP25 wheels we are talking about.

    There shouldn't be a issue with the standard.110" RP-25 wheel since these been around for the last 50 years and is the standard wheel size freight cars and locomotives come in...I'm told the semi scale.087" wheels are finicky when it comes to track work and will drop into the frog of the Atlas switch and crossing especially the C100 track...
    http://www.trainboard.com/highball/i...ompared.60367/

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