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Thread: ? on weathering powders, spray paint ect..

  1. Default ? on weathering powders, spray paint ect..

    So im wanting to purchace a decent set of weathering powders ect. Anything anyone reccomends.

    Also besides powders what else do ya reccomend for weathering (i dont have an air brush, so count that out LOL) Wich brings my next question.


    Also remeber seeing somewhere that you could get spray cans witht he say UP yellow, and others. Anyone know where to get this stuff or was i imagining things.


    Mike

  2. #2

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    Any of the commercially available weathering powders will do. Better known ones such as Bragdon and Bar Mills might be easier to find. The Bragdon ones come in different sized packages with several different colors. Powders will do a great job at weathering, no need for anything much else unless you want to do something out of the ordinary. They can be mixed with alcohol to make a paint-on slurry too.
    Bob Boudreau
    Canada

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  3. Default

    I use Bragdon and the AIM powders....but prefer the Bragdon. Remember to dullcote the model 1st so the powder will stick. Floquil used to make all their colors in spray cans, but not sure if they still do.

  4. #4
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    I also use the Bragdon Powders, i got a set at a train show for $17, came wtih 4 large containers of powders, and its the perfect set for weathering. Came with light rust, medium rust, dark rust, and black. There a bit on the expensive side, but they will weather alot and are very easy to use, as there label says, virtually goof proof. And if you apply to much, take a wet paper towel and wipe off what the excess and unit your happy with it, it kinda makes it look neat, especially on brick. Just remember the number one rule when wiping off with a wet paper towel, ALWAYS WIPE "DOWN" NO MATTER WHAT! lol
    Josh Mader
    Rancho Santa Margarita, Cali

    My latest build; Tire Plant Facility

  5. #5
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    Also see this thread i just posted on Dullcoat, you may end up saving a ton of money not buying dullcoat vs. another available product, and you get 4 times as much of this stuff then you do the tiny little dullcoat can....

    http://www.modelrailroadforums.com/f...ad.php?t=12559
    Josh Mader
    Rancho Santa Margarita, Cali

    My latest build; Tire Plant Facility

  6. #6

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    I've been using Tamiya powders, partially because my LHS carried them... They work good, though come in smaller quantities...
    Josh

    Models: http://rr.blockchoice.com | My Videos: http://youtube.com/user/jbaakko
    Model Railroad Tips: http://www.modelrailroadtips.com | Custom paint services, & Hobby shop: http://www.blockchoice.com

  7. #7

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    I use weathering powders from Sierra Scale Models. They are very reasonable(about $5-$6 if I remember correctly) and work well. I also use normal chalk pastels as well with good results.

  8. #8

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    I use Doc O'Brien's powders from Micro Mark. They work great, but the set comes with a bunch of colours I can't see my self ever using! Getting individual colours may be the better alternative in the future. I've heard a lot of good things about Bragdon and AIM and know some guys that use them to great effect. The powders can be a little expensive, but even a small container will last a long time! A little powder goes a long way.

    If you know someone or somewhere to get powdered paint pigments, you can probably save a ton of money by using them. It is basically the same stuff.

    Gauche and Water mixable oils are the other two items I use a lot in weathering. They are great for washes and streaks. Mixing some powder in with them is a great way to create crusty looking rust patches.
    -- Fred Barkhouse Jr.

    Member of the Windsor Model Railway Club www.windsor-modular.com

    You can't spell GarbagE without GE

  9. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stang_crazy View Post
    Also besides powders what else do ya reccomend for weathering (i dont have an air brush, so count that out LOL) Wich brings my next question.


    Also remeber seeing somewhere that you could get spray cans witht he say UP yellow, and others. Anyone know where to get this stuff or was i imagining things.


    Mike
    Weathering powders are great to use but don't limit yourself to them alone. Look around and see what else you can experiment with. I've use everything from different color ink washes, to cigar and cigarette ash. I've even used ash out of the fireplace, and dirt (after processing) out of the yard.

    Since you don't have an airbrush, (I highly recommend that you start saving for one), don't be fooled into thinking that "UP Yellow" is the only yellow you can use to paint a UP engine. Its not. Find any yellow paint that is close to the "UP Yellow" buy it and use it.

    A good friend of mine painted for Overland, and he lives in a town that is so small, that it doesn't even have a McDonalds. What it does have thou is an auto parts store with a paint department. He would go in there and get them to match a paint chip, and would buy a quart of "UP Yellow" auto lacquer for about $10. He could paint several hundred locos before he would have to buy more.

    During the entire time he painted, (or paints? I don't know if he's stopped) for Overland, every loco or car he painted is done with auto lacquer, and not a "RR" color in the bunch!
    Carey
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