Which Bridge Track HO Scale

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#1
I am putting in some proper bridging on my layout and need to install bridge track. The Peco Code 83 track on my layout won't work on the curved Micro Engineering bridging as it is too "springy" and will distort the curve of the bridge. I need a type of track that will not tend to spring back to a straight line and hold the curve. I have read that the Micro Engineering code 83 bridge track is a good option. What are the pros and cons of the various bridge tracks out there and which one do you recommend?

Thanks for the input.
I have some pics of the current upgrade in progress below.
Bridge1.jpeg


Bridge2.jpeg


Bridge3.jpeg
 

MHinLA

Active Member
#2
I'll assume you already know that track on bridges and trestles have at least twice as many cross ties as rest of a RR has. Much the time bridge kits include this special track or at least the molded in ties and spike heads so that you can run rails through them, and may even include guard rails.. I don't know what your situ is, but what would be wrong with using Atlas flex track and devising a way to add the extra ties later on (unless no one will ever even see the bridges from above). M
 
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#3
I'll assume you already know that track on bridges and trestles have at least twice as many cross ties as rest of a RR has. Much the time bridge kits include this special track or at least the molded in ties and spike heads so that you can run rails through them, and may even include guard rails.. I don't know what your situ is, but what would be wrong with using Atlas flex track and devising a way to add the extra ties later on (unless no one will ever even see the bridges from above). M
Thanks for the input. I don’t want to have to go back and add more ties. I think I’ll just get some bridge track.

Greg
 
#4
Micro Engineering Bridge track is excellent for what you are looking for. I used the code 70 Bridge track on my layout.

Boris
 

trailrider

Well-Known Member
#7
Just a wild, and probably NOT very practical idea: If you could find some of the old-style fiber-tie flex track, with the rails held to the ties with staples in every other, alternating ties, that might work for you. When you bend that track, it will stay the way you bend it, and will hold its curvature or bend back straight. It did come with nickel-silver rails, code 100, and I have several places where I used it on my latest layout (saved from previous pikes). I also have used the brass-rail versions for sidings. The tie spacings are pretty close together, and I doubt if anyone but a fanatical rivet-counter would notice it. Just a thought...
 

MHinLA

Active Member
#8
Though 'trailrider' means well, do not try to find and employ the ancient 1950s track he suggests. The rails in them are not nickel silver. They are brass and thus oxidize, causing loco stall outs. I don't understand why you don't just use ME track. It bends and stays bent the way you want it to be ..Atlas flex track doesn't stay bent until you secure it in place. But it's not going to cause any harm to your curved bridges once it's anchored..
 
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#9
I am pretty sure I will be using ME bridge track based on what I have read and from what has been shared on this thread. Thank you all who have contributed your thoughts .
 

trailrider

Well-Known Member
#10
Though 'trailrider' means well, do not try to find and employ the ancient 1950s track he suggests. The rails in them are not nickel silver. They are bass and thus oxidize, causing loco stall outs. I don't understand why you don't just use ME track. It bends and stays bent the way you want it to be ..Atlas flex track doesn't stay bent until you secure it in place. But it's not going to cause any harm to your curved bridges once it's anchored..
Probably too tough to find anyway, but I have some of that stuff with nickel-silver rails! And some of the brass as well. Some of the brass corroded over the years, but I polished the tops and use it on some spurs and house tracks, where I don't have to run a locomotive. Just some cars. I do agree, the Atlas flex track won't mess up your bridges unless the bridges are so flimsy that I wouldn't use them anyway.

I think the ME is the right choice.
 





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