Transition from Kato to Atlas HO Track?

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riverotter1948

Midwest Alliance Rail Sys
#1
I'm building a DCC "test layout" out of odds-n-ends in terms of track and I'm trying to decide how to transition from Kato UniTrack to Atlas flextrack that sits directly on the "table" (foam base). Since the Kato track has a built-in roadbed and the Atlas does not, there's a height differential that needs some kind of (hopefully smooth) transition, like a "ramp".

It seems to me other modelers have had to deal with this kind of situation, for example, when transitioning from mainline track to a siding that's lower than the main line, but I haven't been able to find much of anything about how this is accomplished.

Has anybody else tried (maybe even successfully) to do this?

What kinds of (hopefully simple) suggestions does anybody have?

Thanks!
 

UP2CSX

Fleeing from Al
#2
The simplest solution I've found is cork roadbed. Just glue enough pieces together to match the Kato Unitrack height. Make this about 2 feet long and then start sanding. You can make a wedge shape that will work out just fine. I've also used cedar shingles that already have a bevel, but you still have to do a lot of sanding since the fat end will be way too high. Using cork has worked out the best for me.
 
#3
Kato makes a transition track from unitrack to flex track, and it is inexspensive. Just look up the kato track listing and find the adaptor section, I am using two of them to atlas on cork or foam roadbed, and just chisel it down until it sits flush. I am using it for the open space on my cinder pit on my steam service area. Kato to Atlas to Kato. hope this helps.
 
#4
Kato makes a transition track from unitrack to flex track, and it is inexspensive. Just look up the kato track listing and find the adaptor section, I am using two of them to atlas on cork or foam roadbed, and just chisel it down until it sits flush.
I am in a similar situation in that I am using both KATO and Atlas track. I've looked at the KATO accessories and do not find any adapter specific to this transition. Could you mean that you are using the rerailer for this purpose and cutting it to fit to replace a section of track? It would be great to see a photo.
 
#5
I think it would be great if all the manufacturers of track systems would make transition pieces, that at the very lease would transition from their track to flex or even standard sectional track.

If they would make transitions to other manufacturers track systems that would be great, but I seriously doubt that would ever happen, what with lawyers etc.
 
#7
Also I guess you can just remove the unitrack joiners, and then replace them with the atlas joiners, and then tack down both sides if the tracks so the joiners hold. Soldering will hold them tight. I am not sire if they make a Snaptrack adaptor in HO scale, I have the N scale version. Again hope this helps somewhat.
 
#8
Okay sorry for that , I see you have HO track. But removing the joiners and replacing them and then soldering might fix it, in combination with the roadbed. Sorry again I did not realize you had HO.
 
#9
Thanks for the info. It would be nice if KATO had more to offer in their HO scale line as they do in N scale. I'll experiment with the cork and solder method.
 
#10
Yes it would be nice if Kato supported the HO lines more, good luck with your projects. I like the Kato track, but it sometimes does not lend itself well to making yards and spur areas or transitions to other equipment, etc. It is great when you are strting out becuase the stuff snaps together and stays on carpets and table. Once you start getting serious about your layout, it can get tricky. The stuff is expensive though so you hate to just not use it.
 





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