Those gigantic tanks we see in places which rise and lower ?

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#1
Hi. What exactly are they ? Are they gas for homes ? Do they therefore rise up when full (gas rises) and lower as they empty ? Is this the only way they're able to store it ? Also, are there less of them now ? They don't seem to be as prominent. Or, is that just due too so many more buildings blocking them from view ?
I'm new round here but been in MRRs since mid 1950s. Tanks, M
 

Boris

Beach Bum
#2
What exactly are they ?
Gas Tanks
Are they gas for homes ?
Among other customers
Do they therefore rise up when full (gas rises) and lower as they empty ?
YES.
s this the only way they're able to store it ?
No
Also, are there less of them now ?
Yes
Back in the day, Gas was manufactured by local Gas utilities, usually from coal. With the advent of Natural Gas pipelines, Liquid natural gas etc. the need and expense of providing gas service by conversion of coal was reduced.
There were several tanks still in use by Elizabethtown gas, in Elizabeth, NJ twenty years ago. They were used in the winter to supplement pipeline gas. Normally, by this time, rather than manufacturing gas on site, it was brought in in tank cars from the Bayway refinery and pumped into the tanks. it was a sure sign of spring, when the last of the tank cars was pulled, and the level of the tanks diminished.

Boris
 

migalyto

Well-Known Member
#3
Gas Tanks

Among other customers

YES.

No

Yes
Back in the day, Gas was manufactured by local Gas utilities, usually from coal. With the advent of Natural Gas pipelines, Liquid natural gas etc. the need and expense of providing gas service by conversion of coal was reduced.
There were several tanks still in use by Elizabethtown gas, in Elizabeth, NJ twenty years ago. They were used in the winter to supplement pipeline gas. Normally, by this time, rather than manufacturing gas on site, it was brought in in tank cars from the Bayway refinery and pumped into the tanks. it was a sure sign of spring, when the last of the tank cars was pulled, and the level of the tanks diminished.

Boris
Can you post a photo of what these are? Still confused as to what they look like.
 

tootnkumin

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#6
As said, they were originally used for coal gas supply, mainly for the towns, and the gas was known mostly by that name. Town Gas.The dome actually floats in water, which acts as the seal, because the dome is open at the bottom which allows the dome to rise and fall with the volume of gas within, but most importantly, the dome's weight was calculated to provide an even and constant pressure through the supply pipes of the system. The name for them is Gasometers.
 

Greg@mnrr

Section Hand
#7
John Allen had at least one of these tanks on his GD layout. On page 104 of Model Railroading with John Allen is photo of one John's tanks and is called a "see-through gas holder".

1530813103192.png


This is a more modern storage tank and near empty.

Greg
 
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#8
Hey ! I was right !! But I did not know about the water seal and being open on bottom, or the downward weight keeping even pressure to clients !! They scared me a little as a kid !! Tanks a lot for clarification...M, Los Angeles
 





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