Sawmill kitbash

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Gary B

The Fox Valley Railroad
#21
Erik,
Sawmill is looking good! Another method for attaching textures to a project I use is to print them out on full page mailing labels. It works surprisingly well. Just don't want to waste too many labels as they are more expensive than other options.
 

Greg@mnrr

Section Hand
#22
Erik:

Have you considered using individual pieces of strip wood to complete the interior? Maybe a bit time consuming, but you could weather and age each piece to give the overall interior the appearance of being old.

Greg
 

DairyStateDad

Mumbling in the corner
#25
Greg -- You are too kind! Let's see how the whole thing turns out, and I'll make sure to take lots of pictures.

BTW, on your individual pieces of stripwood... An idea I like in principle, but I think I'll stick with using the paper walls I've been planning inside for ease of application and in the theory that it will be "good enough" for now. As I complete the assembly of the shell, I do want to make it easy to go back and do things like adding lighting and interior details over time, without having to wait until I am able to do that before I put it in service.

One of the more immediate decisions I'll be mulling over is whether to use the windows that came with the kits or to upgrade to Tichy or Grant Line products.

I'm also giving thought to an appropriate exterior paint (which I will brush apply)... I cannot tell from the black and white pix I see what is likely to be most appropriate for era and locale.

All that said, I'm grateful for all the cheerleading this place produces.
 
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DairyStateDad

Mumbling in the corner
#31
Great work so far. The interior walls just look too clean though. Are you going to weather them any?
Thank you, Willie, and also Mike!

I agree that they look too clean. They're inkjet printed on paper, so I suppose the easiest way to "weather" them might be to go back into the original image files on my computer and experiment with tweaking the colors on them. Still another alternative might be to go back to the website from which I downloaded the images I originally used to make these ones, and there choose something darker and more rustic, then repeat the process I used to create this particular wall image.

On the other hand, if I can do a light India Ink wash without smearing the original details in these images, that would probably satisfy and save a little time. Perhaps if I sprayed these with fixative at this stage, then did the wash, that would keep them from smearing? I don't know.

On reflection, I think trying that will be my next step -- get fixative, spray some of the papers I've already printed, then try a drybrush of India Ink Wash and see how that turns out.

If anyone has any other alternative ideas (keeping it simple, mind you).... I'd welcome them.

Probably the toughest challenge is that I don't really have any period-appropriate color images to which I might refer in order to get a clearer sense of the look or color shade that would be best for these interior walls. (As always, any references anyone can guide me to would be more than welcome!)

I am dealing with that same question as I think about the exterior -- whether to go with a dark brown like almost a creosoted surface, or a more natural wood brown (or perhaps weather-worn gray), or something like that. It's impossible to tell from the black & white pix I've been collecting what those colors should be.

(I've actually ruled out red, though, for the exterior. My plan is to paint all the depots on the line a somewhat subdued red with white trim. So I don't think I want any of the other wooden buildings to be that color or anything close.)

Thanks again, all, for the encouragement.

And now, if you didn't already, you can understand the motto at the bottom of my signature block here!
 

Greg@mnrr

Section Hand
#32
Erik:

Have you considered using powers like Pan Pastels and lightly weather the areas until you have the desire effect? Easy to use and I like to start light and then apply more. There should be a Pan Pastel in a color slightly darker than the basic material you're using.

Perhaps a window or two on the long wall.

Also how about some vintage signage inside on the walls. Safety signs, ads, name of the sawmill whatever.......?

Just a thought.

Looks good.

Greg
 

DairyStateDad

Mumbling in the corner
#33
Erik:

Have you considered using powers like Pan Pastels and lightly weather the areas until you have the desire effect? Easy to use and I like to start light and then apply more. There should be a Pan Pastel in a color slightly darker than the basic material you're using.

Perhaps a window or two on the long wall.

Also how about some vintage signage inside on the walls. Safety signs, ads, name of the sawmill whatever.......?

Just a thought.

Looks good.

Greg
Oooh, I didn't even think of powders -- and I have some on hand (not Pan pastels, but suitable). Thanks! We'll be out tonight, but it looks like I know what tomorrow night's task will be

The long wall will have openings, I just haven't cut them in the paper inside wall. And yeah, signs and stuff like that on the inside for sure.
 

DairyStateDad

Mumbling in the corner
#34
Well, I think it's time to get some pastels. I have some weathering powders and tried some, but used too much, too dark, and it's pretty uneven. Still, with a better selection of proper pastels, that should help tone these things down. Thanks again for the tip, Greg....
 



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