New Layout for LASM

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logandsawman

Well-Known Member
Have a couple pics of the new project, it is the water tank at the Wyoming depot area, these photographs were taken in 1917:

2 Plow-train,  1917).jpg

Wonder if anyone has a recommendation as to a kit I can start with? You can see the configuration of the stand is not what we usually see in the available kits, but somewhat simpler.

3 Plow-train 1917.jpg

This is another photo showing the larger area, this is from a massive TIFF file which I shrunk down but gives perspective as to where the photo is taken from, in conjunction with the photos above.

I used to think that this was taken from the water tank, however now it looks like it was taken from some other tower or possibly power pole (?) considerably off to the side, as the water tank sits almost in line with the potato warehouse:

Wyoming @ 1920.jpg
 

Iron Horseman

Well-Known Member
Wonder if anyone has a recommendation as to a kit I can start with? You can see the configuration of the stand is not what we usually see in the available kits, but somewhat simpler.
Well simpler in some aspects, but more complex in others. That angle on the legs is going to be difficult to get "right", and the central pipe enclosure is going to have to be more detailed than normal (since you can actually see it).
 

logandsawman

Well-Known Member
Well simpler in some aspects, but more complex in others. That angle on the legs is going to be difficult to get "right", and the central pipe enclosure is going to have to be more detailed than normal (since you can actually see it).
Good points... I spent some time searching images today and found modelers frequently scratch build their tanks. I found some examples and hope to share them tomorrow

I wish the lighting was better in the photos
 

logandsawman

Well-Known Member
here is another shot of the water tower, is a closeup of one above, also a set of plans I found on the internet, will adapt this I think.

It looks like all the boards for the tank run vertically,

march 17 1917 heavy snow.jpg

water tower j peg.jpg
 
Really nice looking station. I also think the random shingles that are off color as a realistic touch. Looks like a building a few years after the roof is installed.

Modeling the roaring 20's
President of the Lancaster Central Railroad
President of the Western Maryland Railway
 

logandsawman

Well-Known Member
RBMN-- thanks for the depot comment!

Greg-- I am going to guess some ice formed around the peremiter, however this was a very busy location and new water being pumped in regularily presumably kept the tank liquid.
 

logandsawman

Well-Known Member
Well I have some pics of the water tank I will be adapting to fit my prototype. I found this on ebay, an alexander scale model which held a lot of similarities, and included the spout and other details which I decided would be easier to get by purchasing a kit than the scratch build supplies separately.

Here is a shot of the first page of the instructions. I like they include many details about the prototype.

IMG_1163.jpg

The main difference is the prototype I am copying is taller and the stand is erected slightly differently. Also, in the several photos of the prototype, the roof does not show up, and I am not certain that it has one; I don't believe any overhang shows which should be evident.

IMG_1164.jpg

The center wooden contrivance around the pipes is called the frost jacket, and was made of several layers of wood and paper as insulation. Apparently, water with ash was pumped in to the tank to reduce scale and minerals that were found in the water.

IMG_1165.jpg

another shot of the prototype. I am going with the tank size as built with the kit, but will try to copy the stand as shown in the prototype photo

IMG_1166.jpg
 

logandsawman

Well-Known Member
Good evening guys,

Still working, in fits and starts, on my Northern Pacific project, has become a multi year project, will last me well into retirement.

Just now purchased this locomotive to go with my era and line, Northern Pacific between St. Paul and Duluth from 1910 through 30's, found this gem on ebay and appears to be something that would have run these tracks. After I am able to dig out my 1917 timetable I can verify the engine number.

Plan to paint and decal this for my next project:

Got this from Ebay for 73.02. Hope I didn't get taken to the cleaners
ebay 440.PNG
 

montanan

Whiskey Merchant
Glad to see you back on the forum Dave. I know I have missed your posts and I'm sure others have also. That locomotive would be a perfect fit. Can't wait to see it painted.
 

logandsawman

Well-Known Member
Hi Willie and Chet, thanks for looking at my thread again! I also have a couple box car kits that I will be assembling, probably be my first projects, just prior to painting the 4-4-0

Here is the Walthers box car kit:
box car.PNG


These simple ready to assemble kits are a good way to get otherwise out of production stock on the layout

Stock car.PNG


This Proto 2000 kit will be a little more involved, probably more detailed, however I am looking forward to it!

Below: This is from a Walthers kit like the top one, came in the same box, one of my favorite freight cars


NP 90010.jpg


Thanks for looking!
 

logandsawman

Well-Known Member
Hi guys,

My newest project is this 36" by 2 track display for the kitchen window sill. Purchased a couple pieces of flex track and cut a 2 x 4 just slightly long and spray painted black, will ballast and adhere track to display trains in our kitchen window.

For ballast I used some gravel material from our soils lab, sieved through a #40 and #50 size mesh to get the size of ballast that looks appropriate. Notice the two piles with the flat car for perspective.

#40 would be 40 openings per inch, I think that will work. The screen lets fall everything finer so the pieces are consistent.

For the display, I will be assembling some freight cars, painting and decalling the locomotive, and applying some weathering for this miniature "layout"

IMG_1217.JPG


IMG_1218.JPG


There will be a couple nails in the track then the glued ballast should hold the track securely.

Incidentally, this small section can be incorporated into the larger layout, along with the Wyoming depot scene, when it comes to that.

I can sieve any color material, this white stuff was gravel which does resemble some of the ballast found in this area.

Thanks for looking, Dave
 

Sirfoldalot

Plucked Tailfeathers
Staff member
DAVE -- Explain to me sumting - Is the gravel you screened between 40 and 50, or is each pile, one 40, and one 50?
Did you wash the gravel to get out the dirt and dust before hand?
 

logandsawman

Well-Known Member
Hi Sherrel,

One pile (the 40 pile), flowed through the 30 screen and was caught on the 40 screen. The other pile is the 50 pile, which flowed through the 40 screen and got caught on the 50 screen. The next screen size is 100, and the material trapped on that screen was altogether too fine.

I thought the material trapped on the 30 screen was too coarse, however the next greater screen is 10 so that screen holds more larger pieces; that is everything passing the 10 and then trapped on the 30.

To answer your question about the dryness, these samples were just air dried prior to screening.


hope this helps
 
Last edited:

logandsawman

Well-Known Member
Here I am painting the track. I am using the Woodland Scenics product for rusty tracks. I have done this with attached tracks however find that this is an advantage to be able to hold the track at any angle.

I sharpened the tip of the felt applicator to it would get into the groove better.

I have also previously experimented with using acrylic paints and rust colored weathering powders, applying with a small paint brush, with good results.

I will also be applying the rusty tracks product to the tie plates. The ties I will not be painting, however, as the dust from the ballast will bring out the wood grain in the plastic ties:

IMG_1219.JPG
IMG_1220.JPG
IMG_1222.JPG


I prefer to rub the paint off the top of the rail while it is still wet, using my fingernail and finger. The paint will mess with the conductivity of the track if not dealt with at some point.

Dave
 





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