My attempts at weathering

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wheeler1963

Aurora & Portland Owner
#4
Thank you Alan, Dave. I'll need to get some shots outside in natural light. These are quite washed out to me. I did these with chalks, my next few with be with water based paints.
 
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tootnkumin

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#5
Thank you Alan, Dave. I'll need to get some shots outside in natural light. These are quite washed out to me. I did these with chalks, my next few with be with water based paints.
Photos don't always show the reality, especially taken under artificial light. That boxcar I did looked much more heavily weathered out in the daylight, so I used a 3/4" soft paintbrush to go over it to remove some of the excess powder. To the eye it looks much better now. The guys who do displays on dioramas, always seem to take their pics outside.
 

tootnkumin

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#8
Dry brushing with oils? When I've tried it I tend to forget to wipe off the paint in the brush to a minimum with predictable results.
 

Espeefan

Well-Known Member
#10
Dry brushing with oils? When I've tried it I tend to forget to wipe off the paint in the brush to a minimum with predictable results.
Toot, that's why we have turpentine. If you get too much just wipe it back off with a brush leaded with turpenitne. One hint: get yourself the real turpentine, not the fake stuff. It's expensive, about the same as a good Bourbon or Scotch but well worth it. I've found that sometimes in wiping off excess I actually get better results. Go figure. A few of my best weathering jobs are recovered disasters.
 

Espeefan

Well-Known Member
#11
Acrylics applied with a small brush, then pulled down with a wet brush with a bit of window cleaner on it.
Using any chalks or pastels Jerome? What you're doing looks just fine, and I don't do everything this way but serious weathering for me is usually a mix of three medias. The airbrush is always one of them. I use acrylics, oils, chalk, Pan Pastels, and Prisma Color colored pencils, though not necessarily all of them on any given project.
 

flyboy2610

Loveably weird
#13
The thing to remember with chalks is that they work best on a surface with a flat finish. A gloss or even satin finish is nearly impossible to get chalks to adhere to. The sealing coats have to be very light.
Most of this was done with gray chalk and very light coats of flat acrylic. Repeat the process to get the effect you want:
001.JPG
 

Espeefan

Well-Known Member
#14
Alan, I tried chalks with so-so results. I airbrush the bottoms and ends quite a bit.
A lot depends on which chalk you use. The pastel sticks from Wal-Mart, etc. don't do me a very good job. I started using the Rembrandt soft pastels. The chalk medium used to make them seems to be denser and not so much blows away when you seal them. They're a bit pricey compared to others but they last a long time. Don't buy sets, just get a few earth tones. Here's a link to a color chart. Scroll down. :) https://www.dickblick.com/products/...GrMw3s1rGcjRpZMrLKrWTWn4EJsRRKQRoCGSEQAvD_BwE
 

Espeefan

Well-Known Member
#15
The thing to remember with chalks is that they work best on a surface with a flat finish. A gloss or even satin finish is nearly impossible to get chalks to adhere to. The sealing coats have to be very light.
Most of this was done with gray chalk and very light coats of flat acrylic. Repeat the process to get the effect you want:
Looks good. Not to be a nit picker but you should really paint that bell bracket! ;)
 

wheeler1963

Aurora & Portland Owner
#16
For me, adding window cleaner to chalks and making a mix works best. See the ex-CSX car above. Leaves a raised area like flaking rust. The last 3 cars with acrylics doesn't leave that affect. So more experimenting to continue.
 

Espeefan

Well-Known Member
#17
I was dipping the brush in alcohol and then dipping in Bragdon's. The effect of layering is important for a realistic job, which is why I use multiple medias.
 





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