Looking for Ideas to Store New Florescent Tubes

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Greg@mnrr

Section Hand
#1
I'm looking for some ideas as to where to store new four foot, florescent tubes. My layout is lighted by mostly four foot, F40 -T12 florescent tubes which are no longer manufactured and supplies will become limited. I stocked up a a supply of extras so I wouldn't have to retro fit my fixtures to T-5 tubes.

Now where to store the tubes? Under the layout is full of storage and work areas. Most of the rest of the basement is finished and no where to hide them. Garage no place either.

They would look out of place stored in the formal dining room...right?

Any ideas?

Thanks.

Greg
 
#2
I'm looking for some ideas as to where to store new four foot, florescent tubes. My layout is lighted by mostly four foot, F40 -T12 florescent tubes which are no longer manufactured and supplies will become limited. I stocked up a a supply of extras so I wouldn't have to retro fit my fixtures to T-5 tubes.

Now where to store the tubes? Under the layout is full of storage and work areas. Most of the rest of the basement is finished and no where to hide them. Garage no place either.

They would look out of place stored in the formal dining room...right?
Ha!, Only if the formal dining room is ever used. I think mine is under a half inch of dust due to lack of use.

I have the advantage of having a Janitor's closet to store them in. I made a 4 foot long bin on the very top shelf. Also I keep the boxes they come in, so it isn't just loose tubes piled all over the place.

But but but, I've been replacing my T8 and T12 bulbs with LEDs. Direct size replacements for $5.99 to $7.99. Much better light, less energy consumption, no chance of dropping and getting phosphor and mercury all over everything, and most importantly for my library and train layout room - zero UV emissions.
 
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#5
Not sure where you got your info, but only low CRI T12's are discontinued. My local Home Depot has about 800 T12's in stock. I store my stock of bulbs (I buy then in 10 packs, 4 packs at a time) in their cartons in the basement. But as the current on hand stock is depleted, I'm converting to LEDs for 2 reasons: more light and less heat.
 

Greg@mnrr

Section Hand
#6
Ian: Good idea on the storage of the lamps in the ceiling. I'll use an area in the other finished part of the basement. Spread the load a bit in a few areas.

Had to purchase the lamps loose, so no boxes to storage them in.

Kevin: From Sylvania's website...

T12 Fluorescent Lamps ​Federal energy legislation such as EPACT (The Energy Policy Act) mandates the phase out of many of the older T12 linear fluorescent lamp types. Advances in newer, more energy efficient fluorescent systems like T8 and T5, and CFL, coupled with utility rebate incentive programs, give end users every opportunity to replace outdated T12 systems and lower their electric bills.
For applications where T12 lamps are still needed, Very High Output (VHO) and High Output (HO) Rapid start lamps, as well as Slimline Instant start lamps are available in a variety of lengths. There is a limited selection of 4-ft Rapid start, 8-ft Slimline Instant Start, and 8-ft High Output (HO) Rapid start T12 lamps for specialty applications including cold temperature, color critical, and plant growth.

Also: Hasn't the manufacturing of magnetic ballasts for many fluorescent tubes been phased out?

Just my 2 cents worth.

Greg
 
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Selector

Active Member
#7
I would place a couple of lengths of strapping, lath, or whatever across three or four vertical frame members in your garage and slide the tubes behind them, vertically, between the upright 2X6 or whatever the uprights are. I keep garden tools and spare lumber in that type of position and out of the way. If you are worried about inadvertent damage, instead of using lath or strapping, use 1/2" plywood as a cover and slide the tubes behind it.
 

Greg@mnrr

Section Hand
#8
Found a spot under the layout for the tubes. Will secure them them around a piece of plywood and put in a little used corner of the layout belly, with some fasting to secure them from falling.

Thanks for all your input.

Greg
 
#9
T12 Fluorescent Lamps ​Federal energy legislation such as EPACT (The Energy Policy Act) mandates the phase out of many of the older T12 linear fluorescent lamp types. Advances in newer, more energy efficient fluorescent systems like T8 and T5, and CFL, coupled with utility rebate incentive programs, give end users every opportunity to replace outdated T12 systems and lower their electric bills.
Now if they would just do something to help me replace the T32's. I've yet to find an LED replacement for that.
 
#10
I see you found a solution, but, I'd personally look into those LED strip lights that you can get now, much lower power draw, much more directional and they'll usually last a long time without need of replacement,
 
#11
Frank: Being in commercial property management, shopping centers and office buildings, before I retired we looked at LED lighting for the malls. At that time fixtures for the common areas were too bright and harsh. The goal was let the store windows lighting bring attention the store's products, but not over light the common hallways.

Back of house and exterior lighting was a different story where more light and lower operating costs are assets.

No doubt the LED lamps lower energy costs and improved lighting.

As for my layout, the small number of F40 florescent fixtures and lamps, and the cost to operate isn't a factor and being in the basement a little added heat is a bonus. Now I have replacement lamps and the average life of high quality florescent lamps is 15-20,000 hours. I may never have to replace the lamps with the replacements.

Thanks.

Greg
 
#12
Frank: Being in commercial property management, shopping centers and office buildings, before I retired we looked at LED lighting for the malls. At that time fixtures for the common areas were too bright and harsh. The goal was let the store windows lighting bring attention the store's products, but not over light the common hallways.

Back of house and exterior lighting was a different story where more light and lower operating costs are assets.

No doubt the LED lamps lower energy costs and improved lighting.

As for my layout, the small number of F40 florescent fixtures and lamps, and the cost to operate isn't a factor and being in the basement a little added heat is a bonus. Now I have replacement lamps and the average life of high quality florescent lamps is 15-20,000 hours. I may never have to replace the lamps with the replacements.

Thanks.

Greg
Gotcha, I figured that at this point, you'd continue with the fluorescent at least until you ran through those. No point int buying them and figuring out where to store them if you're not going to use them. I'm sure that the power differential isn't anywhere near what it would be for incandescent.

That's interesting about the mall lighting. I'm not surprised that lighting gets that kind of attention, it literally affects how the entire store and all the products are viewed by customers.

I'm personally, toying around with using something like Phillips hue for my lighting because it will allow me to simulate natural daylight going through periods of night and day. But, that's probably a ways off, but would be really cool to have realistic light cycles.
 
#13
For Information and what it is worth.

I had been buying the LED replacements that required the removal of the ballast. No big deal except it takes time. The thing I have least of. Sooooo I purchase a whole bunch (48 to be specific) of the direct replacements where one can leave the ballast in. Figured it would be as easy as open the fixture pop out 4 bulbs, put in 2. ta-da! NOT. When I opened the LEDs there was a sheet warning that these were "not compatible with all ballasts". Sure enough three hours of research shows my ballasts are set up for 4 F40s. These bulbs are made for F32 and smaller. So I theoretically I can't use them without replacing the ballast. I've been tempted just to throw in a set and see what happens. I just hate wasting two $9 bulbs, should it decide to fry them.
 



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