Funny or Strange Names of Prototype Railroads

Affiliate Disclosure: We may receive a commision from some of the links and ads shown on this website (Learn More Here)

Greg@mnrr

Section Hand
#1
I been collecting models of rolling stock from prototype railroads that have strange or different names. Dakota & Iowa, C&G, DM&IR or Black River and Western to start with some names.

What is the strangest names of models of prototype railroads that you have found?

Thanks.

Greg
 

Iron Horseman

Well-Known Member
#3
I been collecting models of rolling stock from prototype railroads that have strange or different names. Dakota & Iowa, C&G, DM&IR or Black River and Western to start with some names.

What is the strangest names of models of prototype railroads that you have found?
There are some railroad names out there that sound really strange to me, but I think a lot of the strangeness is regional. I mean if one lives in a region where there are lots of hoochies, astas, and noogas in the town names, then a railroad with the same doesn't sound so strange.

But as far as those names I've seen on models, the Walla Walla Valley pops to the top of my head. Atlas put it on there HH660 I guess there is also a Seattle and Walla Walla, but I've never seen that on a model.
 
#4
For intentional humor, it's hard to beat the Gorre & Daphetid -- pronounced Gory & Defeated -- John Allen's model railroad that is widely considered to be the most famous model railroad in history. In addition to its name, the railroad had lots of humorous place names on it as well: Helengon, Cold Shoulder, Sowbelly, etc.

If you are not familiar with the G&D, go here:
http://www.doug56.net/GD/

A Google search will turn up other web sites and many fantastic photos of the G&D.

- Jeff
 

Greg@mnrr

Section Hand
#8
The name of this railroad will never be found on any piece of rolling stock, but it was known as the "Bug Line". Starting as the Milwaukee, Menomonee Falls & Western, then later becoming a branch line of the Chicago, Milwaukee, St Paul and Pacific Railway and finally a spur line of the Milwaukee Road until its last days in 1976. The railroad ran from northern Milwaukee county to Merton, Wisconsin. It served quarries, a major beet factory and a variety of other industries. In the early days passenger service existed.

Since railroad people and locals only called it the "Bug Line", no one ever referred to this trackage by its real name.

The "Bug Line" remains today as a recreational trail and an old wooden trestle is all that remains of the railroad on the old right of way. The trestle can be found standing over the south bound CN tracks just outside Sussex, Wisconsin, now a foot bridge.

And, it's still called the "Bug Line today.

Thanks.

Greg



Fred Keller Collection -
 
Last edited by a moderator:
#9
For intentional humor, it's hard to beat the Gorre & Daphetid -- pronounced Gory & Defeated -- John Allen's model railroad that is widely considered to be the most famous model railroad in history. In addition to its name, the railroad had lots of humorous place names on it as well: Helengon, Cold Shoulder, Sowbelly, etc.

If you are not familiar with the G&D, go here:
http://www.doug56.net/GD/

A Google search will turn up other web sites and many fantastic photos of the G&D.

- Jeff
I wonder if John had been jilted by a girl by the name of Helen. I recently purchased a book on him and his railroad and noticed Helengon and Cold Shoulder.
 
#16
I haven't found any of these to be particularly odd, weird or amusing on some special level (and the G&D doesn't count since that's not a real railroad). They're all just local place names and naming railroads after pairs of cities, or a city and region is pretty much the most common way of naming them.
 
#17
Tomahawk Railway (TR) has an interesting name, but it's another one based off the name of a local city/town (Tomahawk, WI), and is the successor to the Marinette, Tomahawk & Western (MTW)
 

Iron Horseman

Well-Known Member
#18
Well, I've always thought Atlanta & West Point was odd and confusing, but that is just because I always think of West Point as a military academy not a town, especially not a town in the deep south.
 

bob

Administrator
Staff member
#19
Could be, but I've always interpreted that as a take on the expression "To Hell and Gone".
Yep, I took it that way too, but I hadn't noticed the cold shoulder. Just figured it was "to hell and gone" as in a really remote place. He had an amazing sense of humor, and much of his layout featured puns and jokes.
 



ModelRailroadForums.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com