First weathering

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RW&C

N Scale with Stone Tools
#2
Not bad. :) I'd tone it down a little though, a thin black wash does wonders. (I just mix weathering powders, chalk basically, with alcohol and brush it on.)
 

Dave S

Tree Farmer
#4
Do us a favor Vinny. Get a tripod or some other form of mount for your camera even if it's nothing more than a block of wood or something like that. It's difficult to see anything because the screen is shaking so much.

Good first attempt at weathering though! Looking forward to seeing more of your work.
 

UPBigBoy

J&A Paint Shops
#6
I would spray it with a wash, what I used is waterproof India ink that is thinned with alcohol so that the alcohol is just darkened; spray along the bottom of the car and along the roof line with a lite coat, let it dry - about 2-3 minutes then give the whole car a spray with a very lite coat. You can go over some areas you want a little darker if you want. Give everything a chance to really dry - overnight - and the dull coat it.

Jim
 

dave1905

Active Member
#8
Weathering is caused by things spraying up onto the car and drifting down on the car, then the actions of the rain on that dirt.

Chalks only replicate some of those actions.

Washes are very useful.

You also need different colors of chalk. Black chalk would be more useful than red. Try and find some earth tone chalks, white, tan, orange, brown, black.

For wood cars I like colored pencils. I bought a couple shades of grey (not all 50) and at a craft store found a pencil set designed for drawing people of color, having a variety of browns and tans in it. On the wood cars I streak along the boardswith colors similar to the car color then with some grays and browns to represent areas where the paint wore off exposing raw wood.
 





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