End of Train Devices/Cabooses

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Greg@mnrr

Section Hand
#1
I am aware that certain railroads had flashers or other electrical warning beacons or lights on the rear of their cabooses. Did any railroad use a FRED like the one offered by Ring engineering?

Thanks.

Greg

1551284196569.png
 

cv_acr

Active Member
#4
The EOT devices plus trackside defect detection systems replaced the functions of manned cabooses. When cabooses were in service they had marker lights. (They did not typically flash though.)

The EOT device communicates back to the locomotive via radio and monitors brake pressure as well as providing the little blinky tail end marker light. AFAIK most of them can also release air pressure in order to apply brakes through a long train faster by having the drop in pressure in the control line travel from both ends.

Every mainline railroad out there uses EOT/FRED devices like that model today.
 
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Greg@mnrr

Section Hand
#6
Trailrider: I'm a fan of cabooses and have all of Walthers Milwaukee Road units as well as the C&NW cabooses by Athearn. But, there is something about that flashing light at the end of a train that I enjoy.

Once in awhile I see the Union Pacific using old C&NW cabooses for switching moves in the Butler, Wisconsin area. Good to see that some of the cabooses are surviving.

Greg

Milwaukee Transfer Cabosse Pic #2.jpg

Close to being a caboose.......
 

Boris

Beach Bum
#8
I guess I meant to ask did railroads us a FRED on their cabooses? Sorry.

Greg
Greg: Yes. Even when the cabin cars were still common, a earlier version of the EOT was used on cabins, especially if the marker lights had failed. Later, after Cabin Cars were mostly retired, EOTs were used to provide a rear end marker on Cabins on locals and with cabins used as riding platforms. The first example, from around 1984 through 1987 and the second example from the mid 1990s, to give you a timeline.
EOT devices not only provided a highly visible marker on the rear of the train, but also transmitted air pressure on the rear of the train to the head end reader. Also allowed the engineer to initiate a emergency brake application from the rear end of the train. First I ever saw one was in 1984, mounted on the rear coupler of the cabin car on Conrail train TV2, arriving at Morrisville, PA.

Boris
 

Greg@mnrr

Section Hand
#9
The FREDs add an interesting touch to the end of a train for both me and anyone who visits the layout. I mounted one on a period correct hopper so I close to being prototypical.
 

Sirfoldalot

Plucked Tailfeathers
Staff member
#10
Trailrider: I'm a fan of cabooses and have all of Walthers Milwaukee Road units as well as the C&NW cabooses by Athearn. But, there is something about that flashing light at the end of a train that I enjoy.

Once in awhile I see the Union Pacific using old C&NW cabooses for switching moves in the Butler, Wisconsin area. Good to see that some of the cabooses are surviving.

Greg

View attachment 34781

Close to being a caboose.......
Man -- Those are two good looking transfer hacks!
 
#11
You should see the old C&NW cabooses used by the UP in Butler, Wisconsin for switching moves. Talk about being old and beat up! Dirty and the windows all boarded up, but still have C&NW markings and C&NW yellow color with a patched UP on either side of the caboose.

Greg
 





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