Chalk for weathering trains,track, structures?

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#3
Chalk is awesome for creating super rust.

I use some of those plastic film canisters that Kodachrome came in. Three do the job, orange, reddish-rust and brown. I shave powder off the chalk stick into the canisters.

I then air brush the item a base color such as rust. While the part is still wet, I toss it into the orange or reddish-rust canister and shake it. Then usually into the brown for the final coat of powder.

By varying the final color used, one can have varying degrees of rust. For instance, to tone it down, end with the brown. To amplify the rust, end with the orange.

I haven't done so, but I assume one could air brush a light coat of dull coat to hold it in place better.
 

Railphotog

Railroad Photographer
#5
After you've tried powdered chalk on models, and see how it easily rubs off when the model is handled, you should give weathering powders a try. They are specially formulated for hobby weathering, and contain an adhesive that is activated when they are rubbed on the model surfaces. There are several firms offering them, such as Bragdon, Bar Mills, etc. They are a step up from chalk powders and a whole lot better.
 
#6
I have seen aerosol adhesives, specially designed to adhere the chalk to the models, you just have to be careful not to spray it on moving parts.
 
N

North Coast Railroad

Guest
#7
I dont have an airbrush, I only use powders to weather. sometimes i spray dull coat on before I apply the powders, or times I have done it after i apply the powders.
I like my results, but I do wish I had an airbrush.
 

zoegraf

Craftsman at heart
#9
After you've tried powdered chalk on models, and see how it easily rubs off when the model is handled, you should give weathering powders a try. They are specially formulated for hobby weathering, and contain an adhesive that is activated when they are rubbed on the model surfaces. There are several firms offering them, such as Bragdon, Bar Mills, etc. They are a step up from chalk powders and a whole lot better.
Good to know. Never knew they existed.
 
#10
does anyone have any recommendation into brands of chalk to try? I know everyone's recommending the super duper weathering powders, but chalk is a). nearby and b). affordable to buy a big assortment
 
T

tmiller

Guest
#12
Chalk is the way to go. Works great and it is cheap. I found my chalk at a craft store where they have an extensive art department, like Joann Fabric or Pat Catan's, didn't try Michael's, buy they may have it. Or try any artists store. Haven't sealed any of my weathered stock or locos. So far the chalk is adhering pretty good.

Happy weathering.

Ted
 
#14
I use artists chalk, rub them down to powder by scratching them across a piece of sandpaper, then dump it into a container. Brush it on, then matte clear coat.
 

Pete V

CEO Bangor and Santa Fe
#15
I have been using Pastels, which are a little different than chalk. They have a slight amount of oil in them. They are usually sprayed with a fixer when you are actually doing drawings with them to keep it from deteriorating. Sadly good pastels are expensive but last for a long time. I got mine most recently at Michaels, which if you can get past that burst of fragrances at the front door has some interesting stuff. They work really well on trucks which take a lot of physical abuse.
 

Espeefan

Well-Known Member
#16
I dont have an airbrush, I only use powders to weather. sometimes i spray dull coat on before I apply the powders, or times I have done it after i apply the powders.
I like my results, but I do wish I had an airbrush.
So what's stopping you? They are pretty inexpensive. You can get decent equipment for less than the cost of a locomotive.
 

Espeefan

Well-Known Member
#17
I use the Bragdon weathering powders, and I like to apply then with 91% alcohol. Dip your brush in the alcohol, dip it in the powder, then apply the powder to the car. If it looks too heavy, brush on more alcohol and wash it down to where it looks right. The alcohol will leave a light blush on the car, but this will disssapear with a coat of flat finish. A good set of Bragdons powders cost me less than $30.00 and after about three years I have plenty left.

I don't recommend oil based pastels. You also don't have to grind them up. just rub a stiff bristled brush on the sticks. You'll pick up enough powder to use, and your pastels will last longer! I also use Prismacolor colored pencils, dry brushing, and the old faithful airbrush. No single method does it all. I have tried oil painfs too, and gotten interesting effects.
 
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Cjcrescent

Master Mechanic
#19
I haven't seen mention of this but if it has been mentioned, I apologize for the repeat.;)

To get the best results using the chalks, they have to be applied to a surface that has been sprayed with a dull coat. This gives the surface "tooth" for the chalk to adhere to.

You also have to "over apply" the chalk, as it needs to be sealed with a dull coat, and this will blow off some of the chalk. I have also had success using hair spray to initially seal the chalk with. I use the pump bottle kind that I can spray above the model, letting it mist down onto the model's surface. I have very little loss of "color" from the chalk.
 



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