Building the Pinacle Creek Mining & Timber Co. RR

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HOexplorer

Well-Known Member
#21
oxfordlawn, I found that after about a day that I would put on the first wash. I use Woodland Scenic's Black in about a 3 parts black to 10 parts water, or about a third. I wanted my rocks to show depth and a bit of a dirty look. I did the wash three times allowing complete drying (overnight) between washes. I also did it three times because I wanted a darker rock.

There is no problem using India Ink either. I don't like acrylic paint washes on the stucco. It just doesn't come out looking correct. Easier to use the WS Black or India Ink. Jim
 

HOexplorer

Well-Known Member
#22
Thanks for the nice complements fellows. Some comments about Stucco: I think a better rock carver than myself could work wonders with Stucco. I simply went back and forth and up and down with my putty knife. If you have the patience and wait for that 'perfect time' to carve this Stucco can be made into almost any type of rock you want. The best part of Stucco is that when dry it is rock! That is why I think in HO and largers scales this is a good way to go.

What about weight? More but not a huge difference from hydrocol castings. Any benchwork will hold Stucco. As you will see my layout will hold a lot of Stucco. Modules to the trainshow? Maybe depending on how much you use. What I have found is that Stucco will not crumble or crush. It is rock when dry. Good for transporting. Jim
 
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#23
That really does look simply amazing. If desired, could you add things like trees to the mountainside just by sticking them into the product before it completely dries?
 

HOexplorer

Well-Known Member
#24
Pete, You can have trees absolutely. They are hard to see but there are 'holes' for two trees on this main cliff. I plan on using what skills I have to turn these cliffs into pretty fair resemblences of the real thing. This picture is only the first stage. More to come. While it is not imposible to have trees growing out of cliffs this cliff will have two and I'm not sure the rest of the layout cliffs will have any. Bushes yes, trees are rare.

The trees I'm planning on are evergreen type Caspia trees. I'm making some small ones for this cliff right now so I will post the tree cliff "look" soon. Deciduous trees in this SE Alaska setting are mainly low alder. Not many oaks, or chestnuts up north. Jim
 

HOexplorer

Well-Known Member
#26
Corey, Glad you stopped by.

In the photo you will see my two choices of trees. I don't want to combine them on the layout because in SE Alaska conifers tend to be all one species where I'm modeling. I'm leaning toward the Caspia tree on the right. Any thoughts? Jim

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HOexplorer

Well-Known Member
#29
Thanks guys. Yes, I think I like the right one as well. Just went and bought two Caspia bundles today. I also got some 3/8" and 7/16" dowels. I been using raw umber for the trunk with a light treatment of gray. "Bark" is made by my old small handsaw carving down the dowel.

Railrunner130, Yes the time, effort, and savings is way under the cost of any mold process I've found. Don't get me wrong, I've use the WS lightweight Hydrocol mold system for years. I need so much rockwork, and this is a new scale for me, that I though I had to come up with another way that's all. Jim
 
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HOexplorer

Well-Known Member
#30
I've made some trees and added the first layer of ground cover in the background. I will probably put smaller trees on this cliff as these look a bit large. Still trying to get these trees to look right. I think I need to add more branches. Jim

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HOexplorer

Well-Known Member
#31
Got some more work done. The photo shows some ground covers, bushes and some trees. As you can see because of 'reach' issues I have to build the layout back to front. Some plusses: As I go around I can evaluate the last section and make improvements on the next segment. Negs: Doing the part near the back drop is done on a 2-step stool. Only way. Sore back.

When the upper part you see is finished all the way round the room, about 26 feet, I will start on the left again and do the middle section. This includes track. So I can't run trains all over the layout before scenery as I build a bit different from the norm. Jim

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#32
looking good there, what is your current cost to savings ratios with your "new" tricks verses your old ways? IE are you spending more on the stucco verses the old items you used, are they balancing out cost, breaking even, ect, ect...im sure others may want to know for future as this may be worht it for those who are trying to do good budget builds....
 

HOexplorer

Well-Known Member
#33
Jim, Seems like the cost is slightly in favor of Stucco Patch rocks and netting. The real savings is in time and effort. For all the rocks I'm using on the PCM&T line it would take 10x as long using hydrocol castings. Glue is cheap and glue guns are $12. The time it takes stapling or gluing carboard webbing is about 6/7 times as long as just netting and gluing. Folded wads of paper Woodland Scenics style is okay and cheapest for smaller layouts. This one would take a months worth of papers. When it all comes out in the wash, remember I've done five roomsized layouts, I would give the nod to stucco and netting if you like this rock 'look.' Thanks, Jim:)
 

HOexplorer

Well-Known Member
#34
Here is the beginning of the Pinnacle Creek itself. The plastic mesh and some plaster cloth. In the background you can see the top of the creek. All the gray rock is the Stucco Patch product. The mesh holds it quite well. Also some more ground cover. Remember I build back to front becaues of reach issues in the corners especially. You can also see the wiring for the DCC. #12 bus wire with #16 feeders. I'm new to DCC and I will be happy to get my locos back from the fellow installing my chips. Jim

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HOexplorer

Well-Known Member
#35
Getting some track, Atlas Code 83, laid on the upper level. "Planting" on the rocks continues. Also blurred and to the right front is the pinnacle that gives the layout its name. Jim

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HOexplorer

Well-Known Member
#36
Upper bridge on Pinnacle Creek. Logs were used because on the Alaskan Panhandle trees were plentiful. On this layout in 1931 miners and loggers were pretty much on their own and had to build using local resourses. Jim

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N

North Coast Railroad

Guest
#37
I like it! I live in timber country, and my work is in water quality, so...I tend to have alot of work on logging roads. I have seen some amazing things in the forest for stream crossings. I have seen cars flatened out, and piled on either side of the stream with a culvert in the center, and they just poured dirt back on top. My favorite thing to see when I am out in the woods is the use of old flat cars for bridges. We dont have a RR up here any more, but I still get to see my share of flat car bridges. I really want to model one on my RR.

I like your log bridge, and it is prototypical.
 

HOexplorer

Well-Known Member
#38
Devin, I promise you will see a flat car bridge on this layout. Plus there will be plenty of trees. Nearly 200 if I have the space. I make each tree. I spent my earlier years as a mountain climber and I think my many adventures around the world gives me an incite to what the wilderness looks like. Now to get it on my layout! Thanks, Jim:)
 
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HOexplorer

Well-Known Member
#39
As promised here is a photo of the flatcar bridge. Flatcars where used for decades back in the day on these types of lumber and mining sites.

You can see some of the foliage being added. No trees around this part yet. Remember because of reach issues I do the layout back to front. This photo represents the higher parts of the layout and in keeping with higher elevations the shrubs, plants, ground covers, and even trees are not quite as detailed as they will be in the front of the layout. While I do not subscribe to the 3 ft. rule the lesser detail in the rear of the layout represents the actual loss of visual acuity you experience in the prototypical world. Jim

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