Best code 100 turnouts?

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modelbob

Administrator
#1
I need to replace some #6 turnouts on my layout, as they're consistently derailing some of my rolling stock. The layout is pretty old, and I think they've had some stuff piled up on them from time to time.

The existing ones are by Atlas, and I'm considering replacing them in kind. However, I'm open to other options, for example Peco. Anyone feel that one turnout type is significantly better than the others?
 
#2
I've always found the Atlas models to be very reliable. I've used the Peco models too, and I like their tendency to "snap" one way or another without a switch machine or ground throw. However, they are a different turnout than an Atlas so you may have to relay the other tracks to use them instead of the Atlas ones. Also, they are power routing. I've had sketchy results mixing Peco and DCC, as well.
 

grumpybob

Lake Shore Lines
#3
Most of the layouts i operate on and work on use Atlas Switches. Been using them for years. I have used shinohara, but they can be an electrical nightmare, especially in run-arounds and three way switches. You will eat plastic rail joiners.

Your derailments may be being caused by the points not closing completely, or the pivot rail doesn't seat properly. Plus the flange ways do get plugged over the years. I have found that a good flat file has solved many an atlas problem. Plus if you do switch to something different, you are going to have to put in fillers, because there is no standard in track length beyond the switch.
 

modelbob

Administrator
#5
Thanks for the answers folks...

I made a decision at the hobby shop that will have lasting impact on much of the layout. What I really wanted was a #8 turnout... The Sounder train I want to run just plain doesn't like #6 crossover. The couplers are body mounted, and the swing was just too much.

So, I went to the hobby shop thinking "Well, I'll buy some new #6's and work on these old ones later and use 'em in the storage tracks..." I started looking around, and they had some #8 turnouts in Code 83.

I took one look at them, and suddenly those code 100 custom lines that I liked (and they're still a good turnout) didn't look nearly so good any more.

Compare this:
http://secure.atlasrr.com/mmMOD1/Images/283.gif

With this:
http://secure.atlasrr.com/mmMOD1/Images/0566.GIF

I'm not up to date on model turnouts, but I'm pretty familiar with the real thing, and that code 83 turnout looks real. Not just the rail size, the switch ties are sweet, great spacing and size looks excellent. A LOT more prototypical.

So, I brought home a pair to try. Dropped them in and the Sounder rolls through without a hitch. Great! OK, well the part about replacing 5 other switches on the mainline alone, and knowing that eventually I'll want to rebuild the industry tracks too isn't so great, but other than that...

It's not a total loss. The storage yard I plan on building (3 or 4 tracks, 12 feet long) will use up most of the code 100 track and turnouts. So most of it won't go to waste.


(BTW - Yes, I said Sounder trains, and yes, I earlier mentioned a GG1 and Pennsy K4, and oh, by the way I may also get some Pacific NW logging stuff. The plan is to use some pretty generic scenery in most places, say '30's and 40's style houses and buildings. I've got a little of just about everything, and plan on running most of it at one time or another. I think I'll try and have enough trains (2 to 4) for each "era" and run those during a specific session.)
 





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