Autobraking?

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#1
Hi, I've found some references to an autobraking feature in DCC and I was wonder if that's still something that's used. It appears to be something that comes from Lenz. I've seen some references suggesting that it never took off. But, I'm curious about it. It would be really handy at the end of spurs, sidings and near the edge of my layout.

I've been looking into it and I'm not really finding much information. It doesn't look that involved, but if it's not something that's likely supported, then it's not worth doing.
 

tootnkumin

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#2
I vaguely remember something from when first looking into DCC that used (I think) a section of DC track to trigger a stopping function in a train about to cross into the next power district to protect a train stopped in that next power district ( DCC layout divided up into similar blocks as DC with power boosters for each district, so that a short circuit in one didn't shut down the whole layout ), because, as you probably know, a DCC decodered engine will keep on going until commanded to do otherwise, while there's power to the tracks. I think it also relied on the decoder being programmed to not recognising DC as a power source. (hang on, while I get my bullet proof vest on)
 
#3
I vaguely remember something from when first looking into DCC that used (I think) a section of DC track to trigger a stopping function in a train about to cross into the next power district to protect a train stopped in that next power district ( DCC layout divided up into similar blocks as DC with power boosters for each district, so that a short circuit in one didn't shut down the whole layout ), because, as you probably know, a DCC decodered engine will keep on going until commanded to do otherwise, while there's power to the tracks. I think it also relied on the decoder being programmed to not recognising DC as a power source. (hang on, while I get my bullet proof vest on)
From what I saw in a YouTube video, the section of track is insulated from the rest of the track and diodes are used to halt half of the signal. When the train hits that section it interprets the situation as stop, and slows to a stop.

The wiring for it doesn't seem that hard, it's a total of 5 resisters and a switched used to bypass that when you want to go. Doesn't seem that hard to do, I'm just not sure if this is something people still do.

 
#5
On my previous (DC only) layout, I had a block that was wired with a bunch of different resistors in the power circuit. I had a rotary selector switch on my control panel that could decrease the power, causing a locomotive or "motor" (diesel locomotive) to slow down on the downgrade. Haven't done that on my current layout. Some of the DCC decoders have a back-EMF function that will slow the train down somewhat. I generally just use the throttle control to do that, if necessary.
 



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