3 D Printing

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#1
I have been thinking about these new 3 D printers and how they can be used. I dont know if what Im thinking is possible but could you take a 1/24 scale car model, scan it, and then reduce to 1/87 scale? For all of us that model the modern era finding recent cars for our layouts is difficult. If you could by a 1/24 model of say a 2005 chevy pick-up, then *print* out a few copys at 1/87 scale. Is this possible? Im sure there are some legal issues but Im wondering if it possible to do. Any thoughts?
 

NScaler

Engineer in Training
#4
Yes, what you are saying can be done easily. If you have a few grand to blow you can buy a scanner and a printer and you could replicate anything. I know the CAM software I use can easily scale things up or down. So you could get some very accurate models by scanning a larger object and scaling it down and reproducing with the 3D scanner. I am not sure the level of detail these scanners can reproduce. But some of the work Kent is producing with his is looking very good. I wonder how these printers would do with N and Z scale items, which is what is keeping me from owning one. But anyway, if you have the means, here are some useful links...

3D printers:
https://www.ultimaker.com/
https://store.afinia.com/?gclid=CMTx4Y2jvbwCFStgMgod2nUArQ
http://3d-printers.toptenreviews.com/

3D Scanners:
http://store.makerbot.com/digitizer?gclid=CPeJnvagvbwCFepFMgode2gA9Q
http://www.nextengine.com/
 
#5
The problem with just scanning something, is that a printer such as Shapeways is going to print it out as a solid object. That can require a lot of unnecessary material and ends up costing a lot. Makerbots can hollow out a model, but they won't have the resolution that you can get from Shapeways, Sculpteo, or Moddler. You're probably better off learning to model from scratch. You'll have a lot more control over the end product.


Here's an example of what I'm talking about. If you scan a cube, Shapeways would print it out as a solid cube. That's a big waste of material. By modeling it as a hollowed out 5-sided cube with a separate endcap, you can save a lot of material.

Capture.JPG

Steve S
 
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trailrider

Well-Known Member
#6
The way these things are improving, we ought to be able to scan the drawing of the starship Enterprise and have a full-size version. All we'd need then would be the Warp drive! Vaguely reminds me of an old joke about give me enough steel wool and I'll knit you a stove! :rolleyes:
 

trailrider

Well-Known Member
#8
The way these things are improving, we ought to be able to scan the drawing of the starship Enterprise and have a full-size version. All we'd need then would be the Warp drive! Vaguely reminds me of an old joke about give me enough steel wool and I'll knit you a stove! :rolleyes:
Well it may not be the starship Enterprise...yet...but there have been titanium rocket engine parts made by 3-D printing! Funny, when I was a kid there was a sci-fi book where repairs to a spaceship were made by "matrix spraying" the ship's hull! And I can remember when the smallest electronic calculator was about the size of a brick, could only add, subtract, multiply and divide, and sold for $345! My pocket calc costs about $15 and could almost navigate me to the Moon! So it could be that 3-D printing equipment could come down dramatically...maybe to the point where it will be cheaper to buy one than pay the prices for an HO boxcar! Oh, to be 60 again!
 
#9
There's two kinds of Printers competing with each other in the same way Betacord and VHS did with video tapes many years ago. Filament printers use a thin wire rod to build 3D models. The end result is very course for small stuff, but probably not so bad for larger scales. Resin Printers are the new kids on the block and they can create amazing models. I'm looking at a resin printer because the end result is much smoother. The resin is expensive, plus it needs to be UV cured, but look on Youtube to see what can be done for under AU$500 - US$300.

Print times are painfully slow. A simple model can take many hours to print. (24 hours is not uncommon.)

3D scanning is still pretty much a novelty, but there is free software available. Once again, visit Youtube. Generally, you will need to learn a program like Tinkercad (free) or source 3D patterns from the several sites specialising in shared files. As with Laser Cutting, 3D printing is a double whammy. You need to be proficient with a CAD program, then you need to learn how to use the printer. The learning curve can be very exciting, but it won't happen overnight. Anyone who tries to tell you differently is pulling your leg!

Look in your local area for a club called "Makers". They have the gear and there's a heap of people who can help you.
 
#10
Sorry I never posted any links yesterday, but it being my first post I thought I'd make it simple.

I'm looking at the AnyCubic Proton resin printer mainly because of its low cost in Australia. Unfortunately the resin isn't cheap, but if you plan to make bulk items, it will pay to learn how to make silicon moulds and cast the items with a much cheaper resin.

This link to Luke Towan's printer on Youtube covers pretty much everything - printer, resins, CAD programs, plan sites and how to use the machine.

Printer Video

For those of you who don't know Luke, he's a fantastic model maker and specialises in dioramas a couple of feet square. I strongly recommend you visit his web site Boulder Creek Railroad and also have look at his many videos on Youtube.

Luke is a Cairns Local and a member of our model railway club. He also dabbles in laser printing, but he's better known for his scenery building techniques.
 





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